Three principles for quality in educational videos


With the right knowledge and some training, all you need is a smartphone to film with and a regular computer with an app for screen recording and video editing.

1. Accessible quality
Can students see, read, and hear all the content in the video properly, even when displayed on a small smartphone screen?

– Do not use the built-in microphones in smartphones and computers. The sound quality will be considerably better if you use the microphone in a regular smartphone “hands-free”.

– Replace defective material in your presentation, such as low-resolution images and text  with hard-to-read fonts and too small font size.

– Text the video.

2. Media pedagogical quality
Choose the right media concepts and tools for your specific subjects and teaching. There is a huge difference between a video documentation of a 45 min classroom lecture and a 10 minutes video presentation made by a teacher with knowledge of how to adapt a PowerPoint presentation to a media pedagogical video format.

– Shorter video chapters, around 10 minutes, instead of a 45-minute video lecture.

– Zoom in on details in the presentation material.

– Do not compete with your presentation material by being visible all the time, and do not read loudly from longer text blocks in your PowerPoint slides.

– Replace heavy text blocks with keywords, more pictures, video clips and animations.

3. Engaging quality
The video format is very suitable for a dynamic and engaging teaching. It’s just the imagination that sets the limits for how an educational video can look like.

– Be personal, talk fairly fast, and with high energy.

– Short interviews, discussions, and documentary shots as a complement to your lectures

– 3D-visualizations and animations of various kinds.

– Personal video tutorials

If you take these guidelines into account when producing, you can feel confident that your educational video will be of a high quality.

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